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Jon Hogg

Digital Self Service: Why are councils still struggling to deliver better and more efficient online services?
Digital Self Service: Why are councils still struggling to deliver better and more efficient online services? 1000 666 Jon Hogg

Introduction

At LocalGovCamp18 in Birmingham we ran a session aimed at local authority leaders who are concerned that the execution of their digital self-service strategies are not delivering the desired outcomes.

We looked to uncover and discuss why many councils are still struggling to implement these changes; and for those who have, why are those changes failing to deliver on the expected service improvements and operational efficiencies.

In the session we aimed to:

  • Review the progress councils have made implementing their self-service strategies
  • Take a user’s perspective on the effectiveness and ease of use of a selection of online services
  • Explore the barriers to successful digital transformation and why they are not being removed
  • Identify strategies councils can adopt to ensure online services deliver a better user experience for citizens and businesses.

 

So what did we discover?

Our aim was to be able to answer the 3 follow up points around the key question of “Why are councils still struggling to deliver better and more efficient online services?”

  1. Are your digital self-service strategies delivering the desired outcomes?
  2. Are you still struggling to implement the changes you set out 8 years ago?
  3. Are the changes you have made delivering the expected service improvements and operational efficiencies?

“So what do we need to achieve to deliver these fantastic Digital Self Services”, was the question we posed to the room.  And then we listened (and listened) and…

There was much to be said around this topic, especially the blockers that were inhibiting progress.  The benefits are clear and obvious but there are fundamental blockers to progress that must be addressed to create a positive platform for progress, including:

A fear of engaging with customers/citizens during the service design and user experience (UX) phases for numerous reasons including: because they don’t want to be criticised for wasting money, are afraid of hearing the truth about the current quality of service provided and importantly, don’t always have the available budget (which surely is a mistake if you create a poor UX that delivers failure demand then the budget will be spent on putting things right rather than investing in being proactive and getting it right first time?)

Councils are prudent/risk averse and see change as a huge risk, particularly if it requires a big change and potentially large investment.  They will generally only change if they feel savings will be significant and the risk is low.  They also prefer to stay with what they know, even if better alternatives exist, unless they are forced to change for political reasons.

A challenge for new suppliers especially, is they prefer established products and solutions and anything new or bespoke is seen as a risk that may not work and can’t be seen/tested beforehand.

Collaboration is firmly sitting in the difficult box, for numerous reasons, i.e. trust, ego, pride, politics, etc… all get in the way of doing what they should be doing, i.e. reducing costs by working together effectively.

Focus and priorities are key in the current economic climate. As one delegate wisely said: “We are still trying to digitally transform as an organisation so digitally transforming services are only one of many priorities we have to juggle”. This may also go a long way to explaining the reticence in engaging users in the process of digitising council services. If enough of the decision makers are not not ‘digital savvy’ and do not fully understand how moving services online will benefit both council and citizens,  they are bound to see more risks than opportunities.

 

In summary

So what did we learn from that?  Well, millions are being spent on serving customers poorly using out of date processes and supporting legacy technologies and often not supporting the channel the customer selects eg: not formatted for mobiles.   These barriers to excellent modern customer service provision need to be overcome whilst balancing the risk versus opportunity; remembering that digital transformation means transforming people as well as systems.  Fear must not paralyse action and we all need to be brave and wise enough to be driven by citizens needs and providing an excellent user experience.

How can effective collaboration be an enabler for councils to deliver ‘best of breed’ digital platforms?
How can effective collaboration be an enabler for councils to deliver ‘best of breed’ digital platforms? 1000 666 Jon Hogg

Introduction

At LocalGovCamp18 in Birmingham we ran a session aimed at all local authority leaders who are struggling in the face of shrinking budgets, lack of resources, increasing costs and rising demand to deliver engaging online self-service solutions. We explored how collaborative approaches between multiple authorities could be the enabler for the development of ‘best of breed’ digital platforms.

 

In the session we looked at:

  • The opportunities a ‘best of breed’ platform offers in terms of effective and efficient service delivery and increased revenue generation
  • The potential cost advantages of taking a collaborative approach to developing a ‘best of breed’ platform
  • Reviewed some of the research conducted around delivering a collaborative online online services platform
  • Explored the opportunities, critical success factors and barriers to delivering a collaborative online services platform.

 

So what did we discover?

Knowing what they need to achieve

 

We started off by exploring with the group what they need to achieve to create effective collaboration as an enabler for councils to deliver ‘best of breed’ digital platforms.

 

Key points raised included:

  • Platform and forum would be required to facilitate the collaboration
  • Skills and expertise required to ensure effective collaboration
  • Buy-in is critical, both politically from members and from the officers
  • Should the private sector be involved in collaborations and if so how does that work?
  • Leadership from the very top is key to mandate that collaboration happens and then support its development by creating an enabling framework to support collaborations
  • Identifying commonalities that can be collaborated on, and this is not necessarily with your neighbour.
  • Funding – how will this work?

 

So plenty of challenges, with the 2 key ones being leadership and support from the top and having the skills and platform to support the collaboration.

 

Is the leadership challenge just a smoke screen used by staff, whose job it surely should be to make savings in their service areas by exploring new ways of working?

 

Whether this is or is not true, there is a perceived issue that collaborative initiatives rarely gain enough inertia. Is this a cultural issue? Should collaboration just be encouraged as viable alternative or does it require a more formal approach with councils developing collaboration processes and frameworks?

 

Understanding where they are now

To progress their goals, we 1st need to understand where they are currently positioned.  To achieve this we ran a SWOT exercise with them to define their key Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.

 

Key points raised included:

 

Strengths Weaknesses
·         Subject matter expertise

·         Commitment to deliver

·         Existing partnerships

·         Data volume

·         Core services

·         Shared services agenda – towards provision

·         Staff empowerment – empower talented people

·         Resistance – what does this mean for me and my job?

·         Culture

·         Contracts (terms)

·         Commitments and arrangements

·         Openness and sharing (will to share)

·         Private sector costs/trust

·         Public sector culture (e.g. perceived competition/rivalry between councils)

Opportunities Threats
·         Leadership

·         Cost savings

·         Citizen satisfaction

·         Innovation

·         Talent management

·         Efficient services

·         Connectivity and better turn-key solutions

·         Funding crisis – creativity and partnerships

·         Central Government legislation

·         Political change (politics and temporary/changing agendas)

·         Legacy services/systems

·         Speed of change

·         Societal trends and habits

·         Superficial solutions for PR/political purposes

·         Keeping pace with technology

 

So plenty of opportunities identified where improvements in collaboration would make a real difference, link that with the strengths in commitment to deliver and empowering staff, then surely the wind of righteousness should be well behind the ship of positive collaboration?

 

But apparently not when you look at the key threats which tend to be external ones that the organisations have little control over, including biggies such as the political agenda and societal trends and habits.

 

So how can this all be wrapped together to create a harmonious environment where it is accepted to share from like minded organisations (public and private) to the benefit of everyone?

 

Defining what they have to do to accomplish their goals

So what key changes need to take place and barriers overcome to progress towards effective collaboration as an enabler for councils to deliver ‘best of breed’ digital platforms?

 

  • Currently happens on minor scale, often between neighbouring councils, so how can this be opened out?
  • Needs to be driven by leadership, who are currently seen as the constraint on collaboration
  • Often rivalries such as size, politics, demographic can be barriers, this needs to be overcome
  • There are mechanisms such as pipeline and MHCLG fund which encourage and facilitate improved collaboration, but how successful are they and how can they be improved?
  • Culturally, with councils collaboration needs to be seen as a viable go to option for solving problems, better service delivery and delivering operation efficiencies giving staff the permission and incentive to explore opportunities

In summary

So do the councils need a catalyst to help foster collaboration? It seems more likely that successful collaboration will happen if its proactively brokered than if its left to its current organic processes or gentle incentive. Is this a role for the Private Sector to take the lead to create this collaboration culture and supporting environment or should the Public Sector pick up the reigns and manage their destiny?

 

There is such a large opportunity to be proactive around mass collaboration before the Government makes it compulsory by further increasing the budget deficit, surely acting now is acting smart?

How Does Business Process Mapping Relate To IT And Systems?
How Does Business Process Mapping Relate To IT And Systems? 1024 683 Jon Hogg

Business Process Mapping (BPM) can be an incredibly valuable exercise for an organisation. In the simplest terms, it visualises and defines the processes within an organisation. Not only does this help provide clarity to job roles and business procedures, it can often be the catalyst for changes that improve a business’ efficiency and performance.

What is a Business Process Map?

A Business Process Map is the documentation that prescribes how problems, information and decisions are processed. It identifies a roadmap to solutions by documenting the necessary steps in any given process, from managing data flows to fielding client requests. They help analyse, understand and improve segments within a particular process, thereby improving efficiency.

Flowcharts are a common format for Business Process Maps, documenting workflows and activity from beginning to end. This will include the many variables within a process, such as feedback loops, ad hoc inputs and decision gateways. At any one time, a stakeholder should be able to see all the available options and directives.

What should Business Process Mapping cover?

It is essential that a Business Process Map is clear and detailed. In theory, an outsider should be able to review a Business Process Map and have a strong understanding of the activities and responsibilities within an organisation.

Effective Business Process Maps will provide clarity to operational roles and will often cover workflows across multiple roles within a business. This can be invaluable when onboarding new employees or clients and decreases the training time required.  This also helps delineate responsibility and remits, which can be a significant obstruction within large organisations.

What are the benefits of Business Process Mapping?

In addition to the operational benefits of a Business Process Map, they also provide significant organisational value. BPM considers specific objectives, which can then be compared and aligned to an organisation’s wider goals and objectives. This helps outline performance and can highlight processes that are either working efficiently or require improvement.

One of the key benefits relates to quality assurance and management. Process documentation is required for compliance with many valuable quality accreditations, such as the ISO 9001 standard. As data security becomes more critical to a business, an effective Business Process Map demonstrates the actions and contingencies an organisation employs to safeguard data

Who should use Business Process Mapping?

Business Process Maps are an essential tool for project managers overseeing operational delivery. However, they can also be relevant to c-suite executives, particularly chief operating officers, to review and analyse how a business is performing. This can be crucial when scaling a business or making an organisation more agile to adapt to market developments and innovations.

So, whilst there are many reasons to use BPM, they can all be summarised as improving efficiency and performance across an organisation. But how does this extend to IT and technology solutions specifically? In our next blog, we’ll be talking about how business process maps play a critical role in a business’ path to digital transformation.

The New Age Of Business Intelligence And Data Visualisation
The New Age Of Business Intelligence And Data Visualisation 1024 512 Jon Hogg

Businesses have always amassed data, however the rate at which it is created has grown exponentially. Globally, we output 2.5 quintillion (that’s 18 zeros) bytes of data every day. Estimates suggest that 90 percent of the total data in the world was created in the last two years.

There are now myriad electronic devices, all connected to one another in an ever-expanding network of data generation. However, for all the data amassed, organisations are barely scratching the surface of what it is capable of doing and translating this into real commercial value.

In short, there is a vast amount of data at your fingertips, just waiting to be utilised.

Data Visualisation for Any Business

Until recently, business intelligence (BI) solutions were only available to global organisations with vast budgets at their disposal. One of the key barriers to entry was the ability to interpret these immense datasets that businesses were acquiring. As inter-connectivity has come to the fore, so too have BI solutions that answer the question of ‘what can I actually learn from this data?’

Tools such as Microsoft’s Power BI have bridged this gap, opening data visualisation up to more businesses than ever before. Businesses and organisations of all sizes and industries can now take advantage of the value in data visualisation and business intelligence. It has helped to democratise data, enabling powerful data analysis and decision making in a fast, accessible and easy-to-use platform.

Business Intelligence to Inform Decision Making

Power BI provides the tools to not only assimilate data from vast sources, but to interpret it as well. This is a crucial factor for executives, who can now immediately examine the data that is relevant to them and draw immediate conclusions. This leads to more informed and responsive decision making across a business, driven by actionable data insights.

Today, every business is a data-driven business. Utilising this data properly could create tremendous value for businesses. From greater market understanding, to more effective trend forecasting, the answers are now there for anyone to see. Powerful analysis can link the dots between data and performance, revealing new insight and opportunities.

Customisable Data Visualisation for Businesses

More importantly, platforms such as Power BI are customisable to the needs of a business. All businesses have different requirements and needs from their data, so a customisable and interactive platform is essential. It can help bridge and connect data silos from marketing, finance and sales, breaking complex data into clear insight across all departments and functions.

Even now, BI solutions and their applications are developing at a rapid rate. That’s why the BI market has exploded and is set to grow to a value of $22.8 billion by the end of this decade. It will become the cornerstone of high-level strategy and decision making, which was once impenetrable without vast budgets and specialised resource.

If you’re interested in business data solutions and would like to discuss your business requirements, talk to us today or call us on 0203 281 7342.

How System Audits Help Charities Improve Efficiency
How System Audits Help Charities Improve Efficiency 1024 682 Jon Hogg

All businesses face pressure to make the most from tight budgets. It is charities and non-profits, however, who experience this pressure more than most.

Improving Efficiency and Productivity

With complex governance and shoestring budgets, the third sector needs to make every penny count. System audits offer an effective way of maximising an organisation’s efficiency. In fact, they could be one of the most profitable projects you undertake.

A system audit may not seem like the most effective use of time or resource, but they can be. System audits make every penny spent on IT and systems work far harder. Whilst they may not represent a direct return on investment, they improve efficiency and productivity of the entire organisation.

Preventing a System Crisis or Breakdown

Regular system maintenance is far more cost effective than an entire disaster recovery. If a system were to malfunction, the unexpected cost of repair can be crippling. When it comes to your IT and systems, prevention is far better than the cure.

Not only do system audits help keep your system network healthy, they identify problems before they become critical. Often, breakdowns arise from simple oversights that a system audit would catch.

Maximising the Return on Investment of a System

There are few better ways to improve organisational efficiency than a system audit. By assessing how stakeholders use systems, they often highlight knowledge and skills gaps that you may not be aware of. This ensures that systems meet their full potential, whilst also identifying new opportunities. If you need to improve or modernise a system, an audit will highlight it.

System audits also reveal new opportunities for innovation and integration. By better integrating disparate systems, you can streamline processes and avoid duplicating work. This helps free up resources for more beneficial tasks and improves efficiency.

The data that system audits provide about operations is invaluable when considering investment. It will help prioritise particular systems and identify what needs to be maintained, modernised or replaced. This helps build a clear picture of your system network and the true value of an update.

Supporting Digital Innovation for Charities

Organisations process more data than ever before, with data security becoming increasingly important. One of the more technical benefits of a system audit is that it provides more control of sensitive data. This is even more crucial for charities, who often need to optimise pathways through complex and regulated processes. If you’re thinking GDPR at this point you’re on the right track.

Charities and non-profits are already acknowledging the need to embrace new technology. This will have a drastic impact on how charities operate, internally and externally.

In this way, regular system audits have never been more valuable for charities. Each new innovation presents a new set of questions; ones that system audits can help answer. Only through regular health checks can an organisation be confident in the long-term viability of their systems.

Otherwise, you could find yourself throwing good money after bad – something that charities can ill afford to do.

If you are a charity or non-profit who need support with an external system audit, talk to us today or call us on 0203 281 7342.

System Audits in the Insurance Industry
System Audits in the Insurance Industry 1024 658 Jon Hogg

The insurance industry is frequently accused of being slow to adapt. We often hear about the burden of legacy systems and how they cause problems for the industry.

It’s no surprise when you consider the scope, disruption and cost of updating a legacy system. Yet, with so much money left on the table and businesses at risk from more agile competitors, insurance firms must face up to modernisation.

So, when is the right time to maintain, modernise or completely replace a legacy system? This is a difficult question to answer, but regular system audits can help solve this problem.

Adapting legacy systems

As the insurance industry grew and developed, systems had to adapt to meet the demand. This meant patches and updates beyond a system’s original scope, which complicated them.

Many of the legacy systems used in the insurance industry will be decades old. Countless updates will have transformed them, adapting to each new regulation or requirement.

Modernising or replacing a system can be a big risk for an organisation. Nobody wants to disrupt business critical systems. What if the new system doesn’t work as intended? Or your clients and customers don’t like the changes?

If a system stopped working one day, the decision to invest in something new would be much simpler. But it won’t. It will keep plugging along. A new process here; a rushed update there.

That’s the problem. Legacy systems still ‘work’. But how well?

When should you update a legacy system?

A system audit looks at how your organisation uses all your systems. It gives you precise usage data and identifies priorities for modernisation or replacement.

This is often invaluable when trying to build a business case for investing in new software. Without this information, it’s almost impossible to assess the true value of an update.

In short, system audits help answer the question of whether you should maintain, modernise or replace a legacy system.

New technologies in the insurance industry

So, why has the insurance industry been slow to update ageing legacy systems? According to a survey by Willis Towers Watson, 42% of senior level executives believe that complex regulations slow digital adoption and innovation.

It would be easy to dismiss new technology as another regulatory hurdle to overcome. In reality, the insurance industry stands to gain more from developments such as the Internet of Things or data visualisation than most. More data points and machine learning assist with risk profiling, as well as the accurate and timely provision of data.

Of course, firms shouldn’t adopt these technologies in isolation. You should consider them in relation to the impact they will have on the performance and security of existing systems.

Again, a regular system audit helps ease the adoption of new technologies. It considers your entire system network, identifying appropriate solutions for the wider business.

Systems audits and business agility

We know that global insurance firms are being disrupted by more nimble competitors. Today, more than ever, business agility is imperative to remaining competitive. Firms must adapt to new models and ways of operating quicker than ever before.

For example, the market is currently experiencing a trend towards self-service and customer experience. Whilst this is most prominent in consumer insurance, we know from our own experience that corporate and commercial insurance isn’t that far behind.

How do you know when to adopt these new practices and technologies? A system audit builds a picture of how your business uses its systems so that you can prioritise accordingly. In other words, it helps a business stay agile.

By understanding your current systems, it is easier to assess the value of new technology. You become better informed and can be quicker to adapt when it is necessary.

Instead of reacting to changes, firms who use system audits can proactively plan for them. It creates a forward thinking culture, rather than one that is always fighting fires with patches and updates.

Which, if we’re being honest, is something that the insurance industry needs to be better prepared for.

If your business needs support with an external system audit.

The Business Case for Regular System Audits
The Business Case for Regular System Audits 1024 682 Jon Hogg

We call them ‘healthchecks’. You might call them ‘system reviews’. But, whatever name they go by, system audits are rarely an easy sell with the director or the board. They can take a long time to complete, the associated costs may not have been budgeted for and they might divert resources from the delivery of other business projects.

Whilst that may sound pretty damning, the truth is that they actually provide value and competitive advantage, if you know how to leverage them. So, if you’re struggling to get sign-off, we’ve prepared the business case for regular system audits…

System audits improve cost efficiencies and return on investment

One of the major benefits of a system audit is that it can help you assess how those systems are performing. Whether it’s shelfware or a bespoke system, you need to ensure that you’re getting a return from your investment and the system is performing as it should be.

Whilst this could mean examining the underlying code, a system audit also takes how the system is being used into consideration, identifying solutions to improve efficiency and performance.

Many organisations will have business critical systems, yet fail to properly utilise them. In the case of legacy systems, many of your most senior employees may not know how a system functions, which can cause significant inefficiencies and is, in essence, a wasted investment and use of budget.

It’s important to remember that the person or team performing the audit need to be impartial, which is why businesses often engage a third party or external supplier. This ensures that there is no vested interest in the review, so you don’t end up with the developer of a system trying to gloss over it’s flaws and inefficiencies.

System audits can be required for valuable system accreditations

As data and information security becomes more important to clients and consumers, demonstrating the security capabilities through an accreditation or industry standard will become even more valuable for businesses.

Often, accredited certifications and regulatory frameworks will require evidence of regular and robust system audits. If your business wants to achieve or maintain ISO 27001 standards, you’ll need to have a system audit in place.

Not only will a system audit help you demonstrate that your business meets the necessary standards, it will also identify any problems and resolve them if there are gaps in your system security.

System audits ensure legal compliance with licensing agreements

A robust system audit will consider the terms of your software licensing and any compliance issues that you may not be aware of. It may not sound exciting but it could save your business tens of thousands of pounds.

If you’re a large business or enterprise using shelfware, eventually the publisher will come calling with a software audit request to ensure that you’re fulfilling the terms of your contract. They want to see if you’re using more software than you should be, which they are legally entitled to do.

The number of software audit requests are only going to increase as well, as publishers like Microsoft, IBM and Adobe respond to rising cloud integration, which makes the issue of licensing significantly more complex.

As software is moved to a cloud environment in your own data centre, you open yourself up to a number of licensing issues. For all of the benefits, it also makes it very easy for users to take on more services than they need and violate license agreements. In fact, because it is harder to track, simply moving to the cloud may alert a publisher that it’s high time for a software audit.

A system audit, however, catches this early and rectifies it by identifying if you are overbuying or underbuying, which is well worth doing, because…

System audits protect your business from penalties and outstanding fees

If you are found to be using more than your agreement indicates, you could be liable for penalties, retroactive charges and outstanding licence fees. By this point, it will be too late to revise your licence and someone will be in hot water for not having identified the problem sooner.

Of course, regular system audits can prevent this from ever happening, ensuring that you’re fully compliant with your licensing and terms of service. Not only that, they also minimise any business disruption software audit requests can have, by providing readily available usage data.

So, it’s pretty plain to see that in this case, the prevention (a regular system audit) is much, much better than the cure (paying a lot of money in penalties).

If your business needs support with an external system audit, or to discuss your business software needs, talk to us today, or call us on 0203 281 7342.

Software Solved are now officially a Xamarin Authorised Consulting Partner!
Software Solved are now officially a Xamarin Authorised Consulting Partner! 1024 682 Jon Hogg

Good news folks – we have just had the honour to be officially recognised as a Xamarin Authorised Consulting Partner. This is a great reward for our team who have been working extensively with Xamarin recently. They delivered a fantastic project for The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health – read more about it and how we saved them £40,000 here.

Being able to work with Xamarin means Software Solved are even better placed than before to deliver a fantastic service for our clients. You can trust us to advise on when Xamarin is the perfect technology for your needs, and also trust us to deliver on time and on budget.

If you want to know why Xamarin is the perfect technology for Cross-Platform app development, then read our blog here.

If you want to talk to one of our experts about how Xamarin could help you with cross-platform app development, talk to us today.

Software Solved at the Tech Exeter Conference
Software Solved at the Tech Exeter Conference 958 491 Jon Hogg

On Friday the 8th September 2017 we sent a few lucky representatives of Software Solved to the Tech Exeter Conference. If you haven’t heard of Tech Exeter, here’s what you need to know:

  • Run by Kris Sum and Rob Glover – it is a focal point for all things ‘tech’ in Exeter.
  • They organise regular meetups for those who work, or are just interested in the tech industry.
  • Their meetups include lightning talks, a chance to network, and are a chance for community members to collaborate and connect, whilst also providing training and workshops.

They run an annual conference highlighting the most exciting tech trends, with the best regional and national speakers who are experts in the field. So it would have been remiss of us not to go!

Flying the Software Solved flag at the conference were Rudi, Jon, Dom, Duncan, Ash and our MD, Anthony. They spent the day soaking up tech knowledge like sponges and over the next couple of weeks they will be sharing what they’ve learnt right here on our blog.

You can look forward to blogs on the following topics over the next 2-3 weeks:

  • Turning developers into testers
  • The Internet of Things
  • Augmented Reality
  • Machine Learning

Without descending into hyperbole, these topics have the genuine potential to cause significant changes in the tech industry, and indeed, they already are to some degree. Our experts will be looking at what these changes may look like, how it will affect the industry, and what it means for other businesses.

Keep your eyes peeled, and look out for our tweets signalling there is a new one out!

If you want to find out more about Tech Exeter, click here.

Five Major Benefits of Data Visualisation for Charities and Non-Profits
Five Major Benefits of Data Visualisation for Charities and Non-Profits 1000 667 Jon Hogg

Huge amounts of data are being generated every minute of every day. In fact, 90% of the world’s data has been created in the last two years alone. When you factor in the global proliferation of internet connected devices, this isn’t surprising. But, how do you extract the value from this data?

Data isn’t worth a great deal unless it can be interrogated, analysed and used for decision-making. And it’s worth even less if people don’t understand it.

Data visualisation, the presentation of information in a graphical or pictorial way, is a great method of making data easy to view and understand. Tools like Microsoft’s Power BI mean this is no longer an incredibly complex task – its quick and easy to set up, and start getting insights from your data.

The five major benefits for charities and non-profits are:

1) Increased transparency with stakeholders

Charities and non-profits must be transparent with donors, supporters, service recipients, and members of the public about how much they are spending on what and why. Presenting this information in a graphical way helps people understand the data quickly and easily.

2) Removing the complexity

People can digest images and graphs more easily than reading through rows and rows of numbers. If you are dealing with large and complex datasets, visualising this data makes it much easier for other people to understand, particularly if they are not subject matter experts.

3) Deeper insight

Data visualisation makes large and complex datasets easy to read. This means that you can identify trends, anomalies, and insights with ease. Comprehensive data visualization tools will enable you to drill down deeper into specific data segments as well. This allows you to glean more insight from your data and identify areas that need further interrogation.

4) Improved internal communication

No matter how hard you try to avoid silos, they often exist within organisations, especially those with several large departments. Sharing insights and information in a graphical way can be a great way of informing other departments what’s happening in the organisation. These can be presented as dashboards on intranets or internal applications, enabling self-service, and saving you even more time.

5) Improved organisational performance

When you are actively using insights from your data, you will be making better strategic decisions, thus improving the perception and performance of your organization, both with potential donators and volunteers, and your current team.

As a non-profit, you’re highly likely to be collecting your own data, whether it’s as simple as user behaviour on your website using Google Analytics, or more detailed information on how stakeholders are interacting with your applications or services. Are you confident that everyone within the organisation can understand the information? Is it being used to inform decision-making to improve the effectiveness of your organisation? If the answer to these questions is no, then talk to us today to see how data visualization could benefit you.

If you’re interested in a great visualisation on just how much data is generated every minute, then take a look at this infographic